StashAway Insights 2022 - Bridging the Gender Investing Gap

In Malaysia, women are more likely to stay invested 1.18 times more than their male counterparts. The gap widens the longer our platform has been live in each of the regions.

StashAway Insights 2022 - Bridging the Gender Investing Gap

StashAway Insights 2022 observes the gender investing behaviours since our launch in Singapore in 2017.

The genders portrayed in this report are based on the gender our clients indicate to us when they sign up to use our platform. The report excludes data from investors who did not specify their gender when they signed up.

Our results are based on data from our global client base in Singapore (SG), Malaysia (MY), the Middle East, Hong Kong (HK), and Thailand (TH).

However, as the Middle East, Hong Kong, and Thai platforms are less than 18 months old, they have only been included in this edition of StashAway Insights where there is sufficient data.

Lower-risk portfolios

The StashAway Risk Index, or SRI, indicates the 1% probability of losing a given percentage in asset value in any year. For example, an SRI 25% portfolio with $100,000 has a 1% chance of losing 25%, or $25,000 in a year.

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Across all regions, male investors are more likely to invest in portfolios with a higher SRI. Higher-risk portfolios are more likely to be met with short-term volatility.

However, women are more likely to follow through with their commitment to investing.

For instance, in Malaysia, 44% of women who signed up have invested on our platform, compared to 32% of men.

Less Frequent

Generally, men check their investments 1.5 times more often than women.

"In Malaysia, men are more likely than women to log in in their first 30 days of making an investment. We believe that women are less reactionary and anxious about their investments after making a decision than men, hence they do not check their investments constantly."

Women investors

Since making their first investment, women in Singapore and Malaysia were, on average, 1.1 times more likely than men to invest each month.

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"However, in the Middle East, where our platform has been live for a little over a year, we see the opposite trend: men were, on average, 1.3 times more likely to invest consistently compared to women," says the report.

In Malaysia, women are more likely to invest consistently compared to men at 1.22 times over a period of 20 months, in comparison to male investors.

Stay Invested

Investing for the long term takes patience and consistency. Our data shows that women are more likely to stay invested and less likely to withdraw their investments and close their accounts. Investors may close their accounts for a number of reasons: they may be dissatisfied with returns, worried about the markets, or they may simply have reached their investment goal.

In Malaysia, women are more likely to stay invested 1.18 times more than their male counterparts. The gap widens the longer our platform has been live in each of the regions.

Long-term Wealth

Women aren't investing enough While women are more likely to invest consistently over the long term, statistics show that they aren’t investing enough.

This is despite the fact that women, on average, have higher life expectancies than men, and therefore more retirement years to plan for.

68% of women believe they will outlive their spouse. Malaysian women born in the year 2000, have an average life expectancy of 75 years old, outliving their male counterparts by 4 years.

She Invests  

"We’ve extended StashAway Academy, our free personal finance course, to our new masterclass series: She Invests. She Invests aims to educate women about personal finance and investing.

"Female clients now make up 42% of StashAway’s new client base in Malaysia, up from 14% since launch in October 2018.

"We asked the attendees of our She Invests sessions to use one phrase to describe their greatest fear when they first started investing. The majority of attendees feared losing money the most. We also asked the attendees what other alternative assets they were considering as investments. We found that crypto was the most popular asset class," says StashAway.